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Posts from the ‘genius’ Category

1
Sep
air-timelapse-spinning-photos

Q marks the spot – Treasure Map 72 (September 2014)

Sacred Treasure

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2
Aug
The-Pure-Package-Treehouse-31

Q marks the spot – Treasure Map 71 (August 2014)

Sorry this late – It’s been an absolutely CRAZY month (including finishing a job, moving house and going on a couple of week long meetings.) Soon, normal Q service will resume, I promise!

BETTER LATE THAN NEVER, I SUPPOSE.

Sacred Treasure

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1
Jul
streetview-murder_2928520k

Q marks the spot – Treasure Map 70 (July 2014)

Sacred Treasure

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20
Jun
Chelsea & Greenwich Pensioners cricket match

Friday Fun 48: Monopods vs Monobracchs Cricket

Well, the book’s first draft is done and sent off – the initial editors’ comments are awaited with trepidation. But the good news (I hear you ALL cry) is that I can get back to some serious blogging. And what better way to mark this momentous event than by offering some Friday Fun.

One of my recent excitements is the quirky Cox’s Fragmenta. This is edited by Simon Murphy from a really bizarre tome in the British Library – essentially a scrap-book of news clippings kept by one Francis Cox (1752-1834) on every subject under the sun. In fact, it takes up 20 feet of shelving. So I thought it might be fun to pick out a few choice morsels.

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1
Jun
TGV

Q marks the spot – Treasure Map 69 (June 2014)

Sacred Treasure

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1
May
Rev Tom Hollander

Q marks the spot – Treasure Map 68 (May 2014)

Sacred Treasure

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1
Apr
Spaghetti Harvest

Q marks the spot – Treasure Map 67 (April 2014)

Sacred Treasure

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1
Mar
Miles Davis at Columbia Records 1957 - Aram Avakian

Q marks the spot – Treasure Map 66 (March 2014)

Sacred Treasure

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1
Feb
ScarJo

Q marks the spot – Treasure Map 65 (February 2014)

Sacred Treasure

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30
Sep
The Weather Project by Olafur Eliasson (Tate Modern 2004) taken by John Carter

The humiliation of incarnation… Iain Banks somehow, surprisingly, gets it… sort of

Iain Banks (known as Iain M Banks when he’s writing science fiction) had the most extraordinarily fertile imagination. It was one of the reasons his books have been so loved and respected. His last SF book before he died of cancer in June at only 59 was The Hydrogen Sonata, in his Culture series. I’d not read any of his books before but was very struck by the way people talked about him over the summer, and so decided to make amends. Well, I certainly dived into the deep end.

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25
Jul
Douglas Adams 42

Douglas Adams eats biscuits on Cambridge station

This is one of my favourite short, and true, stories. It comes from the pen of the wondrous Douglas Adams, he of Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy fame. It needs little explanation or introduction. But it is the perfect illustration of all kinds of self-delusions and self-righteousness.  Read more »

5
Jul
Operation Fortitude

Friday Fun 45: Exposing an enemy’s deception with some wartime humour

Operation Fortitude was a crucial, bold, almost insane, factor in the success of D-Day in 1944. It was a hugely elaborate hoax, to make the enemy believe that the Allies’ continental invasion would happen across the straits of Calais (Fortitude South) and from Scotland into Norway (Fortitude North). Read more »

6
Jun
NewYorker June 3 2013 - socializing with nutters

Friday Fun 42: Beware the narrowing of the circles in which you move and have your being

My mind is steeped in the mad and self-referential world of conspiracy theories at the moment, as I try to make a way through to something coherent. So this great cartoon from last week’s New Yorker nailed it for me.

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3
Jun
George Orwell at the BBC

Let the meaning choose the word: Orwell on political language

It has its gainsayers (eg Steven Poole is pretty disparaging, though unfairly in my view) but George Orwell’s Politics and the English Language (the whole essay is online), is prophetic. Of course some of his linguistic concerns are matters of taste and fashion (as Steven Poole rightly notes). But written at the close of the Second World War, this article exposes the sham sincerity and dissembling motivation behind so much political speech and writing. That is the essay’s great virtue. And it has not gone out of date at all. Read more »

22
Mar
victor-borge-piano

Friday Fun 40: Musical comics and comical Musicians

They don’t make ‘em like this anymore. 3 entertainment heroes: Morecambe, Borge & Dawson, all passed on, but all wonderful in their different ways. And they had impeccable timing, comedic and musical.

Enjoy. Read more »

15
Mar
Cate Blanchett as Elizabeth I

Friday Fun 39: Swotting up on the English Reformation (part 3: Elizabeth I)

For the time being, this is our final dip into the murky waters of Sellar & Yeatman’s classic 1066 and All That. After all, overindulgence is always wrong. Wouldn’t you agree?

Having digested the reign of Henry VIII, and then gobbled up his heirs & successors Edward and Mary, we come at last to Gloriana herself, Good Queen Bess, the Virgin Queen, the one who was to be obeyed (on pain of decapitation etc etc). These Tudors weren’t exactly a straightforward bunch. No doubt, there were post-natal attachment issues which can explain all the shenanigans.
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8
Mar
From Terry Deary's inimicable Horrible Histories

Friday Fun 38: Swotting up on the English Reformation (part 2)

Boys and girls, last week’s lesson was only the beginning, the tip of the iceberg. How could you possibly imagine that we had plumbed the depths of the English Restoration? There is more work to be done – not least because Bluff King Hal left quite a legacy, much of which was left much to be unravelled amongst his 3 children and successors.

What a mess web he weaved.
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2
Mar
From Terry Deary's inimicable Horrible Histories

Friday Fun 37: Swotting up on the English Reformation with Sellar and Yeatman

A day late, but hey. It’ll be worth it. But whatever you do, don’t use this for your GCSE history revision. [If you have done your revision, you'll see why]. Having read this, how will you ever be able to confuse the Reformation and the Restoration again? What’s more, whoever thought we’d need Hilary Mantel to bring this era to life?

Anyway, thought I would dedicate one or two Friday Funs to the sublime brilliance that its 1066 and All That. So let’s dive in straightaway, with Henry 6th and his 8 wives. Or was that the other way round? Read more »

22
Feb
NewYorker 11 Feb 13 - Blogger therapy Sutton

Friday Fun 36: Bloggers in Therapy

Every blogger needs to feel the love. But it’s a dangerous pursuit. And sometimes, we need help to get over our hangups.

The cartoon department at The New Yorker is an ever-present help in such troubles – so for your joy, delectation and general therapy, here are some important pointers… Read more »

28
Jan
San_Fernando_-_Iglesia_del_Carmen

A fresh (medium rare) perspective on horsemeat

While the world out there is contorting itself into ever more yogic twists about horsemeat being found in burgers, I thought a little contribution from Graham Greene might be valid. I’m rereading his rather wonderful (dare I say it, quixotic) Monsignor Quixote and encountered this little gem in chapter 1.

After coming to the aid of an out of town bishop, the uber-parochial Father Quixote invites him to lunch in his humble abode. Having to deal with this unexpected guest provokes this conversation with Teresa, his housekeeper. Read more »

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