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1
Oct
Your rainbow panorama - Olafur Eliasson

Q marks the spot – Treasure Map 61 (October 2013)

Sacred Treasure

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30
Sep
The Weather Project by Olafur Eliasson (Tate Modern 2004) taken by John Carter

The humiliation of incarnation… Iain Banks somehow, surprisingly, gets it… sort of

Iain Banks (known as Iain M Banks when he’s writing science fiction) had the most extraordinarily fertile imagination. It was one of the reasons his books have been so loved and respected. His last SF book before he died of cancer in June at only 59 was The Hydrogen Sonata, in his Culture series. I’d not read any of his books before but was very struck by the way people talked about him over the summer, and so decided to make amends. Well, I certainly dived into the deep end.

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23
Sep
double symbols - red ribbons

Double-entendres: the problem with symbolic shortcuts

This is not a particularly profound post (which, incidentally, is not to claim that regular posts on Q are either), but having just finished Sarah Lyall’s rather delightful (if affectionately acerbic) The Anglo-Files: A Field Guide to the British, I came across this amusing story from the Blair landslide of 1997 at which a record number of women (very patronisingly described at the time as Blair’s babes) were elected to Parliament. Read more »

20
Sep
1024px-Musée_Européen_de_la_Bière_-_Old_beer_bottles_pic5

The perils of drink – but it’s not quite what you think

It’s Friday, and so that would normally call for some Friday fun. Well, this post more or less qualifies as a bit of fun, but it’s also a bit of seriousness too. So I’ll let it stand on its own merits. Here is a very helpful and salutary public health warning from the great nineteenth century social reformer and polemicist William Cobbett. It has much to teach us. As I’m sure you’ll agree… Read more »

13
Sep
JFK - Dallas limousine banner

Countdown to Dallas 1963: the inside story of a Sophoclean tragedy

This is a great year for conspiracists – from the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President Kennedy to the constant dribble (and occasional torrent) of government surveillance revelations. It’s all happening. So i’ve been trying to get my head around the whole Kennedy thing. A few years back, I read the seminal bio by Robert Dallek, An Unfinished Life, which is the best place to start (beautifully written, brilliant insights). But have just finished Thurston Clarke’s JFK’s Last Hundred Days which is a week by week account of those final months of his life and presidency. Tragedy is a word much diluted by overuse and misuse – Read more »

6
Sep
MJHM U2 at Wembley

Why getting popcultured is no bad thing: thoughts on Steve Turner’s latest

Regular Q readers will know that matters pop-cultural are regularly considered here. And one of my favourite books of recent years on any subject is the brilliant Popologetics by my friend Ted Turnau. But regulars will also know that I am a fan of Steve Turner’s books, not least because he has a great way with words (I only wish he’d apply that to poetry again!) and has unrivalled experience in writing about the world of popular culture from a deeply theological perspective. So I was very excited by the arrival of his latest: Popcultured. Read more »

1
Sep
q-treasure-map-2011

Q marks the spot – Treasure Map 60 (September 2013)

Sacred Treasure

Read more »

21
Aug
podcast-galatians copy

Rejoicing in Galatian Freedom (an interruption to self-imposed online taciturnity)

Just back from doing the All Souls week away in Bath – my first major thing for work since I was off from 1st Jan. All seemed to go smoothly and happily, which was rather a relief for all concerned. The focus this year was the grace-freedom we have in Christ – which Paul expounds so superbly through Galatians Read more »

6
Aug
Tapisserie_moines_mannequins

Less blogging, more writing

The observant will have noticed that there has been a significant slowdown in Q postings in recent weeks. There have been a number of reasons for this. Read more »

1
Aug
q-treasure-map-2011

Q marks the spot – Treasure Map 59 (August 2013)

Sacred Treasure

Read more »

25
Jul
Douglas Adams 42

Douglas Adams eats biscuits on Cambridge station

This is one of my favourite short, and true, stories. It comes from the pen of the wondrous Douglas Adams, he of Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy fame. It needs little explanation or introduction. But it is the perfect illustration of all kinds of self-delusions and self-righteousness.  Read more »

19
Jul
puffin landing

Friday Fun 47: Skomer Puffins

Trying to write in the wonderfully balmy sun of Pembrokeshire this week has been a struggle! But I’m not complaining. it’s been a joy to be down here, heatwave and all. But I’m particularly thankful to have got out for half a day yesterday to visit Skomer Island at last (been coming to Dale for years, but this was a first). So here is some jollity from the delightful puffins of Skomer. What fun they are… Read more »

12
Jul
sf

Friday Fun 46: Memories of running away from school

It seems that my prep school, where I boarded from aged 8-13 (yes I know, I’m still trying to catalogue the subsequent privileged hangups), is 150 years old next year. They appealed for memories from old boys to be included in the anniversary book. So feeling in a slightly frivolous and provocative mood that day, I wrote this. Thought some at least might enjoy it. Read more »

10
Jul
L'abri reflections

Why I love L’Abri

Many are unaware of L’Abri. And that is both a shame and an inevitability. It is a work that thrives behind the scenes and out of the spotlight. It never advertises or fundraises. It just keeps its doors open to all who come and need it. I’ve only ever spent time at the English L’Abri, but it is part of a family of communities around the world which all sprang from the original work set up by Francis Schaeffer in Switzerland (all the details are on their website). Read more »

9
Jul
A_Picture_of_a_Southern_Town-_Life_in_Wartime_Reading,_Berkshire,_England,_UK,_1945_D25426

Modernist Ministry’s Dehumanising Metrics – consolidated

Last summer, I wrote a series of posts on the highly pretentious sounding ‘dehumanising metrics of modernist ministry’. Don’t be put off (although in fairness, I have to say I was quietly pleased by the alliteration there) because the more I’ve thought about it, and the more I’ve chatted with folks, the more I think there are some crucial things to discuss. This is certainly not the perfect analysis nor last word. But I hope it will at least present something of what troubles me these days. Read more »

5
Jul
Operation Fortitude

Friday Fun 45: Exposing an enemy’s deception with some wartime humour

Operation Fortitude was a crucial, bold, almost insane, factor in the success of D-Day in 1944. It was a hugely elaborate hoax, to make the enemy believe that the Allies’ continental invasion would happen across the straits of Calais (Fortitude South) and from Scotland into Norway (Fortitude North). Read more »

4
Jul
Washington Monument seen from its base with US Flag at half mast. June 2012 by VIPSuperDave (Wiki Commons)

All is not well … in the state of Denmark: George Packer’s THE UNWINDING (USA’s ‘inner history’)

Well, to all my American friends and family, Happy 4th July. I wish you a great day of celebration and fun. That is always a little strange coming from a Brit. After all, you did rebel against us. But I think we’ve kinda gotten over it now (as you might put it). But it’s well-meant. America is a country I’ve grown to love (or at least certainly the bits I’ve visited). And as Bono has said more than once (perhaps explaining why he’s never forsaken his Irish roots despite his love for the US): Ireland’s a great country, but America is a great idea. And that’s what the 4th is all about at its best. A great idea. Read more »

1
Jul
q-treasure-map-2011

Q marks the spot – Treasure Map 58 (July 2013)

Sacred Treasure

Read more »

28
Jun

Friday Fun 44: Weeping after the shrink (Q’s 1000th post, appropriately enough)

A man has been seeing a psychiatrist for many years. It has been a lifeline for him.

But friends were shaken to see him emerge from a consultation in floods of tears, strange because this was the first time it had happened in 12 years.

When he calmed down, he was asked what had happened suddenly to bring this on.

“After 12 years, my shrink spoke for the very first time. His words were:

‘No hablo ingles.’

21
Jun
IMG_2893

Friday Fun 43: HERO – A new poem by Jonathan Rye

Spending time at L’Abri is always a rewarding experience. Last time, I was able to sit down and chat with Dutch film-maker Jaap van Heusden. This time, I managed to complete a whole chapter of the book I’m working on, and get to know lots of great new people . One in particular is a wry, dry, and very witty guy from the Appalachians, who goes by the name Jonathan Rye. One evening he read one of poems which had me chuckling for a while afterwards. He kindly allowed me to post it here. Read more »

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