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January 12, 2012

Orwell on The Unspeakable Wrongness of Taking a Life.

by quaesitor
orwell

I get restless if I don’t have something to read on the bus. So I grabbed the closest thing on my desk as I ran out yesterday – which had been a recently thumbed anthology of George Orwell’s Essays. (I’d been looking at it because of the seminal piece Why I Write, recently recommended to me by the Real Grasshopper). I found myself, somewhat incongruously, sitting upstairs in the front row motoring down Park Lane, and reading a short account of an experience Orwell had in the British Imperial Police in Burma – starkly entitled ‘A Hanging‘.

The whole is a brilliant example of writing at its most clear, spare and bold. But these two central paragraphs knocked me out:

It was about forty yards to the gallows. I watched the bare brown back of the prisoner marching in front of me. He walked clumsily with his bound arms, but quite steadily, with that bobbing gait of the Indian who never straightens his knees. At each step his muscles slid neatly into place, the lock of hair on his scalp danced up and down, his feet printed themselves on the wet gravel. And once, in spite of the men who gripped him by each shoulder, he stepped slightly aside to avoid a puddle on the path.

It is curious, but till that moment I had never realized what it means to destroy a healthy, conscious man. When I saw the prisoner step aside to avoid the puddle, I saw the mystery, the unspeakable wrongness, of cutting a life short when it is in full tide. This man was not dying, he was alive just as we were alive. All the organs of his body were working – bowels digesting food, skin renewing itself, nails growing, tissues forming – all toiling away in solemn foolery. His nails would still be growing when he stood on the drop, when he was falling through the air with a tenth of a second to live. His eyes saw the yellow gravel and the grey walls, and his brain still remembered, foresaw, reasoned – reasoned even about puddles. He and we were a party of men walking together, seeing, hearing, feeling, understanding the same world; and in two minutes, with a sudden step, one of us would be gone – one mind less, one world less. (p16)

We’re never told the man’s capital offence. But that’s deliberate – to do so might somehow distract from the point. What is remarkable is to witness how Orwell takes the most mundane (the act of avoiding a puddle) to signify something so magnificent (the mystery of a human life itself) and thereby articulate his case (the sanctity of human life) – even if it is describing the judicial execution of a criminal (however that might have been argued or justified).

This is political art. But his is no mere, empty rhetoric. Art works best when it is true.

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